Where I reside

 

The Medphoto Festival co-organized with the Municipality of Chania – KEPPEDICH-KAM and with the support of the Club of Photography and Film Mephoto Festival 2016, in collaboration with the Municipality of Chania – keppedih-cam and with the support of the Photography and
Cinema Club of Chania, present the photography exhibition «Where I reside».

Photographers: Stella Aggelaki, Dimitris Barounis, Foteini Farmassoni, Konstantinos Gdontakis, Mixalis Kalaitzakis, Giannis Klouvidakis, Eleftheria Seistaki, Spyros Zervoudakis

Curator: Costis Antoniadis
Duration: 12th – 25th August, @ Sabbionara Gate, Chania, Crete
Opening Hours: 19.00 – 23.00
Free entrance

“Where I reside”

The photographs featured in the “Where I reside” exhibition belong to a genre that ever since the very first years of photographic history accompanies those who believe in its power to remember, to exorcise, to comfort. Eight photographers invite us where they live accompanied by their photographs and their ghosts. Each one in their own way elaborates in the shadows and joys, memories, time, the inmost thoughts, sometimes looking at life head on, sometimes sideways. Their photographs, despite providing few, open corridors through our thought, our imagination, our own experience, our own inner spaces.
However, while reading them we face a paradox, as it often happens with photographs. We approach them casually and only when we cross their threshold we realise how helpless we are in finding meaning in them. So we must heed a warning: every attempt of reading is an adventure ending with void or a conquest. That’s why in my readings of them I begin with prefixing a “maybe” and I keep repeating it.

It is the shadows in Stella Aggelaki’s photographs that blend with other shadows from older photographs, it is her daughter, still a child, that seems learning the way to real life. And then, it is the sleep in Fotini Farmasoni’s photographs; here again shadows and uncertain descriptions, maybe those leading to dreams where adolescents reside during summer months. In Spiros Zervoudakis’ photographs the gaze is different, since it looks like being transferred into that of a dreaming child. And the world is light, exciting in its colourful exaggeration. Children seem to live in an endless feast in the photographs by Dimitris Barounis. They perturb the world celebrating its conquest. Konstantinos Gdontakis disrupts the order of family focusing in unorthodox ways on mundane incidents of everyday life. In Michalis Kalaitzakis’ photographs bodies without boundaries, literally indescribable, seem to swirl obeying an inner rhythm. Gestures however appear clearly, transferring to the photographs the care and tenderness of the reality from which they have departed. A young woman looks like standing a guard to the parental house of Giannis Klouvidakis as his gaze withdraws fragmented memories from his childhood. In Eleftheria Seistaki’s photographs reality returns raw. It is her sister, trapped inside her house since her birth, and the tender gaze of Eleftheria that winds the assumption of a possible, here clearly photographic, escape.

Costis Antoniadis